God

Being Intentional Through The Grief Journey With Teressa Green-Clark

WRT 17 | Intentional Through The Grief

  It can be challenging to be honest about our grief, sometimes. But once you let go of the fear that holds you back from really confronting what grief looks like, it can make the journey much more bearable. Teressa Green-Clark is someone who is not afraid of being honest about her grief. And instead of getting stuck there, she is surviving it day by day. In this episode, she joins Tina Fornwald to talk about her grief journey and why being intentional has helped her along the way. Teressa lost her husband, her sweet face, in 2020. Since then, she has been putting one foot in front of the other, being intentional about confronting her grief. She shares how she is coping with the help of her husband’s words and the Bible. Teressa also talks about letting her grief out through therapy and writing, imparting her own experience to help others in the same journey. Thank you for viewing this post. I am not a licensed therapist or professional life coach. I am sharing my experience of loving the same man for 32 years, a mother to two adult children, a retired military officer, a breast cancer survivor, and my connections with others.  Anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts should reach out to a suicide hotline or local emergency number in their country https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/suicide/suicide-prevention-hotlines-resources-worldwide — Watch the episode here   Listen to the podcast here   Being Intentional Through The Grief Journey With Teressa Green-Clark We are about to have a conversation with Ms. Teressa Green-Clark. She has been a widow for years but she is so intentional. You are going to enjoy this conversation and be inspired. Let’s get into it.     Hello, Teressa. How are you? I’m good. Yourself? I’m good. Welcome to the show. Thank you. I’m glad to be here. I am glad to see you. Tell me, Teressa, what gives you hope? What gives me hope is being able to get through my daily activities despite the grief journey that I’m going through and the pain that sometimes I feel and getting through my day-to-day activities, knowing that I survived today and I can see tomorrow. You said that thing right because you’re surviving the grief journey that you’re on. What I hear is you’re not allowing yourself to get stuck there. You’re trying to survive this. It is a journey. Day by day, not being afraid to be honest about how you feel is one of the things that is so inspiring to me. When I see some of your posts, you are low-key and high-key educating people about what it’s like to deal with somebody that’s grieving and being honest to say, “Don’t get it twisted because I made it to work or I’m living that I’m not hurting even though I could be smiling. I could be smiling one moment and I could be missing a beautiful face another moment.” That’s okay because that’s what grief looks like. You mentioned grieving. Whom are you grieving? Tell us the story of that love. I’m grieving my husband, Willis Clark III. It’s different without him. I met him through a friend. We met in the early part of 2015. It wasn’t long before he knew that he wanted to make me his wife. How long is not long? Probably about a year. We gave ourselves a year of trial and became friends first. What stood out to me when I met him was when he called me on the phone. Most guys want your number so they can get to know you and probably sleep with you but he wasn’t that guy and I felt it. He was like, “What do you like to do? I’m a family guy. I like to do this and that.” We exchange things we like to do. He said, “I want to do some more talking and conversating with you but before, can I ask you something? Can I pray with you?” I was like, “Prayers are always in order.” He was like, “I like that.” He prayed with me. We prayed. Before we got off the phone, we prayed again. That was something from day one until death did us part. We will not start our day out without praying together and we will not end it without praying together.   On the first phone, he said, “Can I pray with you?” Talk about setting the atmosphere. Talk about expectations being risen. Where did you go from there? How long did you talk before you saw each other again? He lived here in Illinois and I was still in Mississippi going to school. I graduated in December 2015. We met at the top of 2015. We talked and conversated daily for 2 and 3 times a day, checking on each other. We became friends before we became anything else. Mind you, he was a widower. He made it his business to let me know, “I’m a widower,” and how long he and his wife have been married. I respected that. Back to us, we talked, conversated, and got to know each other. My sister is another person whom I’m grieving, Ms. Bessie Tinsley. I lost her in October 2022. Her birthday is April 10th. I was coming to visit her birthday party. That was going to be the first time we ever saw each other eye-wise. We talked on the phone but that was going to be our first time seeing each other. That was 4 or 5 months after the talk on the phone. When you spoke the first time, you had never met in person. We have never met in person. You’ve been talking for five months over the phone. When I told him that my sister was having a party up there and that I was going to come to it, he said, “We can have our first date if that’s okay.” I said, “I’m going to do the little family thing. Later, …

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The Challenges And Rewards Of Relocating After The Death Of A Spouse With Monika Dunn

WRT 13 | Death Of A Spouse

  There are many things you can do after losing a spouse. One of these can be relocation. In this episode, Monika Dunn provides insights into the rewards and challenges of relocating after the death of a spouse. The discussion with Monika Dunn wraps up with sharing Tina’s journey from her perspective and those of family/friends. Moving to Virginia, Tina stayed with Monika on her last night in PA. Many connections join Tina’s friendship with Monika, the similarities of their children’s ages, serving in the military, their faith, and being in an interracial marriage, to name a few. Tune in to this episode and see how friendship gets us through challenges. Thank you for viewing this post. I am not a licensed therapist or professional life coach. I am sharing my experience of loving the same man for 32 years, a mother to two adult children, a retired military officer, a breast cancer survivor, and my connections with others. Anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts should reach a suicide hotline or local emergency number in their country. — Watch the episode here   Listen to the podcast here   The Challenges And Rewards Of Relocating After The Death Of A Spouse With Monika Dunn Hello, widowhood. I want to thank you for being on this journey with me. Thank you for investing your time in tuning in to this show and hearing the stories of my grief over the death of my late husband from the vantage point of myself, my family, and my friends. The conversation with Monika in this episode is wrapping up the sharing of my story because I wanted you to understand you are not in this alone. This is a road that I have traveled longer than some and shorter than others. As we continue on this topic of grief and losing a loved one, I want you to know that I care, and I want to hear your stories. I want you to share questions that you would like for us to cover on the show. I would like for you to email me if you’re interested in sharing your story. You can go to the website because Widowhood Real Talk with Tina is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit with the mission of supporting people that are grieving, and providing a candid place for a conversation about grief. That’s what this is all about. You can email me at WidowhoodRealTalk@gmail.com. You can go to our website, Widowhood-RealTalkWithTina.org to be able to share your stories and recommend different questions. Let’s get into this conversation with my friend Monika.     Our conversation is with my girlfriend, Monika. She got me out here way past my bedtime but Monika is committed to the hood, so she got me committed too. I’m appreciative of her time. Monika, tell us a little bit about yourself. I’ve known Tina for quite some time. We go way back to when our kids were little. We met in church mainly because our kids were together and in school together as well. Besides that, we connected pretty easily because we share a lot of similar interests. I have two kids and I’ve worked most of my life either for a company. I work partially for a spa and partially build my own clients so when I retire one day, I’ll have a little lovely job or hobby, and provide some monetary resources as well. I’m from Poland but I’ve been in the US since ’87. This is my home now. I love God. I love sports. I’m very competitive when it comes to football. The Steelers are my team. College football and college basketball, I’m all into it. I love the outdoors. I love working out. I try to be healthy and I like having fun. Let’s go back to Poland. What age did you come to the US and what was your life like in Poland? I came here when I was sixteen. I came from a tiny little place with literally less than 1,000 people in my village. I came from a little place to New York City. That was a shock. Life in Poland was very different from what I experienced here. Most of the people were farming, but not business. It’s to mainly grow food for themselves. Either one or both parents were working as well to provide income. As kids, we work since we were very little, either attending to the livestock, going out and working in the fields, school, and very little playtime. Everybody knew everybody. If you got in trouble with anyone, they would correct you right there. We didn’t get in trouble that much, but it was very loving and open at the same time in some ways. I also had a tough time growing up because my mom was in the US. When I was ten, she left and I didn’t see her since I was sixteen. We also didn’t have phones available or camera phones for sure. I would talk to her maybe twice a year for a couple of minutes with a very bad reception. In between, we would write letters. Also, my youngest sister, who was three at the time when my mom left in ’81, I haven’t seen her until she was ten. She left when she was a baby and then she was a little brat when we got here to the US, but she was super excited to see us. Tending animals, you said two words. You shared some of that with me. I want you to expand on that a little bit more about what tending animals look like. They have to be taken care of every day. Usually, I would get up around the summertime probably at 3:30 or 4:00. I go out there and feed them. I clean up all their mess. I give them water. In the summertime, we would take them out to pasture and we didn’t have enclosures. The way our lots were set …

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