Reclaiming Your Life After Losing A Loved One With Michelle Collins

Widowhood Real Talk with Tina | Michelle Collins | Reclaiming Your Life

  Reclaiming your life after losing a loved one is indeed a hard time to get through. What more if you lose someone dear to you in the most sudden way? Speaker and author Michelle Collins shares how mindfulness played a huge role in overcoming the suicide of her husband. She explains the right level of support and witnessing needed by grieving individuals to get around not only their grief but shame and regrets as well. I also provide valuable insights on remarrying while Michelle opens up about her life of as a stepmother.   Thank you for viewing this post. I am not a licensed therapist or professional life coach. I am sharing my experience of loving the same man for 32 years, a mother to two adult children, a retired military officer, a breast cancer survivor, and my connections with others.   Anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts should reach out to a suicide hotline or local emergency number in their country: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/suicide/suicide-prevention-hotlines-resources-worldwide“ — Watch the episode here   Listen to the podcast here   Reclaiming Your Life After Losing A Loved One With Michelle Collins In this episode, our guest is Ms. Michelle Collins. She’s a speaker, author, grief and wellness coach, yoga therapist, and mindfulness teacher. Let’s get into the discussion.     Hello, Michelle. It’s good to see you. Thank you for being here. Welcome to the show. Where are you from originally? Portland, Oregon. Did you grow up there? Did you relocate at any point in time? I spent most of my life here. My parents and I were born here. I’m the third generation on one side of the family. It was some deep Portland roots. I even went to college here. I moved away and came back. I’ve lived in California, Arizona, and New Jersey. I always end up coming back. I have a dream of living at least part-time in Hawaii. I have not been able to make that dream a reality yet. Before we go to Hawaii, Portland seems like the best to me. There are many wonderful places to have food in Portland. What are some of your favorite restaurants or cuisines there? For the size of the city, the food scene that we have here is phenomenal. I love ethnic food and Chinese food. I love sushi. I’m picking a favorite. Honestly, I don’t think I could because I love food. I’m a mood food eater. If I’m in the mood for tater tots, I am going to go to McMenamins, which is our local pub scene. They try to do fresh and organic. Back when I used to drink alcohol, which I don’t anymore, I loved their screwdrivers because they would fresh press the orange juice in front of you. I can’t even narrow it down. There’s so much good food here. If you have never been to Portland, go and check out every restaurant you can. I’ve been there once for a work trip and there was not a bad meal to be had. I was grateful for the opportunity. One more thing about our food scene is we have extensive vegan and gluten-free that are often hard to find. Have you been to Hawaii before? Yes, many times. On my first trip to Hawaii, I was seven years old. It was a favorite destination of my parents. They would go every year without the kids. One year, they took us. I still remember walking off the plane. This was my first feeling of tropical air. That was back in the day when they would meet every plane with a line of hula dancers dressed up and put a lay on you with fresh flowers that smelled delightful. I still remember that feeling. For the first time, I felt like I was home. I’ve always considered Hawaii my soul home. I have some connection to the land or the environment there. It recharges me. If I go too long without being in Hawaii, I feel depleted. How often do you travel to Hawaii? What’s the frequency for you? It’s as often as I can afford to. If I have a more abundant year, I might go 2 or 3 times. It’s easy to get there from Portland, Oregon. We have direct flights to many airlines many times a day. It’s an easy flight, 5 or 6 hours, depending on what airline you take. I don’t have any Hawaii trips planned in the near future because I’m not quite as abundant. I didn’t think of the ease of travel coming from Virginia to get to. There was a bit of a hall when I went to Pennsylvania. I’ve been to Hawaii three times. I would love the universe to put me in a place where I had to work there for about 30 to 60 days to take in the area. It is also one of my favorite destinations. I was there with my niece expecting her second child, her and her husband. He’s stationed there in the military. I didn’t need much. I could get up and go for a walk for about 4 miles in the morning, take everything in, and enjoy it. It is a place to go, visit, and see. I see the two books back there. Tell me a little bit about those. January 23rd, 2024 will be their one-year birthday. I wrote these two books. My second husband died by suicide in 2016. In 2017, I’m not exactly sure how to describe it but I got a message from the universe. I’ve always been a writer. It wasn’t too far out there for me to write a book about surviving spouse or partner suicide loss. That was in 2017. I rejected the message from the universe because I did not want to talk and write about it. It was still overwhelming pain, shame, and all of the feelings we talked about as widows. In 2018, I met a book coach named Amanda …

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