Therapy

Life After Loss: A Transformative Grief Journey With Alethea Felton

Widowhood Real Talk with Tina | Alethea Felton | Transformative Journey

  Discover the unexpected way a friendship has led our guest on a transformative journey. In this deeply moving episode, Tina Fornwald sits down with Alethea Felton, a dynamic High Performance/Transformational Coach and host of The Power Transformation Podcast. Althea shares her poignant story of losing two of her closest friends. Through her reflections, Alethea explores the profound impact of this loss, detailing how it spurred her to seek therapy and ultimately transform her life. Join us as we delve into Alethea’s inspiring journey from grief to growth, uncovering the lessons of resilience, intentional living, and the power of cherished friendships. — I am sharing my experience of loving the same man for 32 years, a mother to two adult children, a retired military officer, a breast cancer survivor, and my connections with others.  Anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts should reach out to a suicide hotline or local emergency number in their country: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/suicide/suicide-prevention-hotlines-resources-worldwide“ — Watch the episode here   Listen to the episode here   Life After Loss: A Transformative Grief Journey With Alethea Felton Hello, Widowhood. Our guest is Ms. Alethea Felton. She is a dynamic high-performance transformational coach, founder of Alethea Felton Coaching LLC, and host of the Power Transformation Podcast. With over 20 years of experience in the realms of education, instructional design, and learning and development, Athea’s mission is to empower ambitious professionals and leaders to shatter limitations through mindset mastery, unleash their true potential, and create holistic lasting life success.  Our conversation with Alethea is outside of her normal discussion. I am so glad that she said yes to speaking with us. Oftentimes I have conversations with people who are grieving the loss of their spouse but in terms of widowhood. We know that people who grieve our loved ones are dear friends. And that is the perspective in which we will discuss today. Let’s get into this conversation now. Alethea, welcome to the widowhood.      Thank you so much, Tina. I am so happy to be here and thank you for having me.  I want to say our discussion now may not fit in the wedge that people may be accustomed to because you hear the word widow and automatically the conversation is, what is that connection? For this, it is, as we talk about widowhood, it’s not always that spouse that passed. This is a community that is impacted when someone transitions from this world.  Our conversation is for someone who may be thinking of the loss of a dear friend or someone close to them because when someone leaves this world, everyone in their community feels the loss of that person. I appreciate you for stepping off into some uncharted territory with this conversation and being willing to share.  I appreciate that. I just hope that something that I say can affect someone in a transformative way as this journey has done for me.  Transformative. That is a really good place to start. Let’s start with where you are literally in the world today, as far as where your life is in some of your youth, if you would share that.  Meet Alethea In terms of where I am today, I am a full-time entrepreneur now in terms of profession. What that looks like for me is I am a holistic transformational coach, motivational speaker, and podcaster. When I say full-time, I dabbled in entrepreneurship for almost, approximately 20 years, part-time but now I have the flexibility and the freedom where I’ve taken that deep dive into it full-time, where I’m building my business with speaking, coaching, writing, things of that nature and podcasting.  I can tell you that being where I am now is certainly a ride. It’s an adventure. It has its highs and its lows. Every day is unpredictable. Also, in terms of just more of where I am, not just in a job space, I can tell you that every day of my life, I have such peace. I live with great joy. Joy does not mean that every single day is happy necessarily but I have a consistent joy, a consistent hope, and faith. That’s where I am in my life right now. That’s who I am.  How did we get there though? Has this been a space you’ve lived in your entire life or is this someplace you’ve come to recently?  In terms of the emotional aspects of who I am, I’ve always pretty much been an eternal optimist. I was always the person, even as a little kid who always saw the glasses, half full to overflowing. That’s how I always view life. I’ve always looked at things in the positive frame of mind, not ignoring the negative, but really in the positive frame of mind. I can tell you that with my life in terms of where I am, I was born with certain conditions that frankly made chapters of my life quite challenging but to get here, I had to go through a series of hard knocks, heartache, pain, grief to get me to where I am now.  In terms of the entrepreneurial journey, I’m a former public school educator and I use the term educator because I have more roles outside of the classroom. I was a classroom teacher, but for 20 years, I worked in the field of education as an English teacher, Spanish teacher, instructional coach, department chairperson, and team leader. I ended my career in human resources where I was coaching seasoned and new teachers.  I was pretty much the one who determined in a sense, if they kept their employment pretty much. I loved what I did, ended on a high note, and I was blessed to be able to retire early at the age of 41, last school year. Nothing happened bad or anything like that. It’s just that it was time and I’m a woman of faith. I knew that God was speaking to me before the start of last school year about making …

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Grief, Therapy, And Transformation: Learning Effective Tools For Managing Grief With Brad Taylor

WRT 31 | Managing Grief

  Through therapy and self-care, we can transform the pain of grief into the power to heal, rediscover joy, and embrace life again. In this compelling episode, Brad Taylor discusses the effective tools for managing grief. Drawing from his extensive experience in therapy, he sheds light on the challenges faced by individuals dealing with profound sadness and grief. In this compassionate exchange, Brad and host Tina debunk common misconceptions surrounding mental health and explore the complexities of navigating the grieving process. Grief is a unique journey for each person. Tune in as Tina and Brad shed light on the journey through grief and offers guidance and hope to those who may be experiencing loss. Take a step towards healing and discover the transformative power of therapy, self-care, and embracing life again. Thank you for viewing this post. I am not a licensed therapist or professional life coach. I am sharing my experience of loving the same man for 32 years, a mother to two adult children, a retired military officer, a breast cancer survivor, and my connections with others.  Anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts should reach out to a suicide hotline or local emergency number in their country https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/suicide/suicide-prevention-hotlines-resources-worldwide — Watch the episode here   Listen to the podcast here   Grief, Therapy, And Transformation: Learning Effective Tools For Managing Grief With Brad Taylor My guest in this episode is Brad Taylor, who is a Clinical Director. He is going to allow us to see this depression, grief, and journey from a professional perspective. He brings information where, outside of the hood that I have given you personally, your hood can extend to the professionals that are assisting you, whether it is someone who encourages you, a therapist, a counselor, or a professional coach to be able to heal what other people can do to be part of your hood to help you along your journey in missing the person that you love. Let’s get right into the conversation.     My guest in this episode is Mr. Brad Taylor, the Clinical Director of the New Life Counseling Center. Welcome, Brad. Thank you. I’m honored to be here. Thank you. I am glad to have this opportunity. Up until this point, our conversations have been with my friend and my family, which is my hood. Also, in a broader scope of the hood, I’ve mentioned that I have spent time with a therapist, and most of that time was when I was in Pennsylvania. I’m unable to travel all the way there, but I was connected with Mr. Brad Taylor. It is being able to have him come to this forum, share what that conversation would look like, provide also a spectrum outside of grief that I’m familiar with, and be able to bring that in a different way. I’m glad to have you here. Thank you. I’m excited to be here, Tina. Brad, tell us a little bit about yourself. My name is Brad Taylor. I am the owner of the New Life Counseling Center. We are an outpatient mental health and substance abuse treatment center in Virginia Beach, Virginia. We were established in 2006. We provide services to citizens of Virginia Beach and the surrounding localities. Those services include everything from substance abuse counseling to mental health counseling and pretty much anything that may be connected to those types of services. I know that this show is dealing with grief and, unfortunately, dealing with substance abuse addictions, specifically. I often come across clients who are experiencing some type of grief due to overdose and higher rates of suicide by either family members or people that they know. Unfortunately, it has become a common occurrence for us to have clients that we provide services to who are experiencing grief. I’m excited to be able to talk about this subject because I’m certain that it’s going to be able to resonate and help so many people who may be going through it, struggling, and looking for some way to move forward in their lives. If I’m hearing you correctly, you’re saying that people that come to you, the original part may be because of substance abuse, but as you start unpacking their situation, you find out that the origin of that may have been from their grief. It’s very normal. Unfortunately, I have to keep saying that word because it’s not something that we want any of our clients to experience in their lives. We do an assessment of everyone coming in. It amazes me the number of people that when we are asking about past traumas and things that may be relevant to why they have the diagnosis or why they are having the struggles in life that they have, that’s a very common experience that many of them had. They may have had some type of loss in their life, and a lot of them turn to drugs to cope with that loss as a way of dealing with the emotional pain that comes with losing somebody in your life. It’s not only that in a vacuum because a lot of these clients also have a lot of other things that, in many ways, complicate grief. Some of them may come in organically with some mental health things that get exacerbated when they have the loss. You throw the substance use and addictions on there, and then that makes the grief and these other issues more intense. Often, unfortunately as well, a lot of them have gotten themselves in some type of legal trouble. Here at New Life, I would say 90% of our referrals and clients are people who are mandated. It means they’re on probation or parole. They may be linked up with Child Protective Services, have been court-ordered to be here, an employer might have sent them here, or along those lines. When they come to our services, we do a thorough evaluation. We try to treat the whole person. Unfortunately, as part of us …

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Being Intentional Through The Grief Journey With Teressa Green-Clark

WRT 17 | Intentional Through The Grief

  It can be challenging to be honest about our grief, sometimes. But once you let go of the fear that holds you back from really confronting what grief looks like, it can make the journey much more bearable. Teressa Green-Clark is someone who is not afraid of being honest about her grief. And instead of getting stuck there, she is surviving it day by day. In this episode, she joins Tina Fornwald to talk about her grief journey and why being intentional has helped her along the way. Teressa lost her husband, her sweet face, in 2020. Since then, she has been putting one foot in front of the other, being intentional about confronting her grief. She shares how she is coping with the help of her husband’s words and the Bible. Teressa also talks about letting her grief out through therapy and writing, imparting her own experience to help others in the same journey. Thank you for viewing this post. I am not a licensed therapist or professional life coach. I am sharing my experience of loving the same man for 32 years, a mother to two adult children, a retired military officer, a breast cancer survivor, and my connections with others.  Anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts should reach out to a suicide hotline or local emergency number in their country https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/suicide/suicide-prevention-hotlines-resources-worldwide — Watch the episode here   Listen to the podcast here   Being Intentional Through The Grief Journey With Teressa Green-Clark We are about to have a conversation with Ms. Teressa Green-Clark. She has been a widow for years but she is so intentional. You are going to enjoy this conversation and be inspired. Let’s get into it.     Hello, Teressa. How are you? I’m good. Yourself? I’m good. Welcome to the show. Thank you. I’m glad to be here. I am glad to see you. Tell me, Teressa, what gives you hope? What gives me hope is being able to get through my daily activities despite the grief journey that I’m going through and the pain that sometimes I feel and getting through my day-to-day activities, knowing that I survived today and I can see tomorrow. You said that thing right because you’re surviving the grief journey that you’re on. What I hear is you’re not allowing yourself to get stuck there. You’re trying to survive this. It is a journey. Day by day, not being afraid to be honest about how you feel is one of the things that is so inspiring to me. When I see some of your posts, you are low-key and high-key educating people about what it’s like to deal with somebody that’s grieving and being honest to say, “Don’t get it twisted because I made it to work or I’m living that I’m not hurting even though I could be smiling. I could be smiling one moment and I could be missing a beautiful face another moment.” That’s okay because that’s what grief looks like. You mentioned grieving. Whom are you grieving? Tell us the story of that love. I’m grieving my husband, Willis Clark III. It’s different without him. I met him through a friend. We met in the early part of 2015. It wasn’t long before he knew that he wanted to make me his wife. How long is not long? Probably about a year. We gave ourselves a year of trial and became friends first. What stood out to me when I met him was when he called me on the phone. Most guys want your number so they can get to know you and probably sleep with you but he wasn’t that guy and I felt it. He was like, “What do you like to do? I’m a family guy. I like to do this and that.” We exchange things we like to do. He said, “I want to do some more talking and conversating with you but before, can I ask you something? Can I pray with you?” I was like, “Prayers are always in order.” He was like, “I like that.” He prayed with me. We prayed. Before we got off the phone, we prayed again. That was something from day one until death did us part. We will not start our day out without praying together and we will not end it without praying together.   On the first phone, he said, “Can I pray with you?” Talk about setting the atmosphere. Talk about expectations being risen. Where did you go from there? How long did you talk before you saw each other again? He lived here in Illinois and I was still in Mississippi going to school. I graduated in December 2015. We met at the top of 2015. We talked and conversated daily for 2 and 3 times a day, checking on each other. We became friends before we became anything else. Mind you, he was a widower. He made it his business to let me know, “I’m a widower,” and how long he and his wife have been married. I respected that. Back to us, we talked, conversated, and got to know each other. My sister is another person whom I’m grieving, Ms. Bessie Tinsley. I lost her in October 2022. Her birthday is April 10th. I was coming to visit her birthday party. That was going to be the first time we ever saw each other eye-wise. We talked on the phone but that was going to be our first time seeing each other. That was 4 or 5 months after the talk on the phone. When you spoke the first time, you had never met in person. We have never met in person. You’ve been talking for five months over the phone. When I told him that my sister was having a party up there and that I was going to come to it, he said, “We can have our first date if that’s okay.” I said, “I’m going to do the little family thing. Later, …

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